In the post-implementation phase of projects implementing standard OEE metrics, new customization metrics will typically emerge to meet specific business needs. Required modifications can be found at the level of data collection, calculation of indicators, analysis of results or control of related processes. Now let's look at modifications to the OEE metric that can be used to evaluate and reward staff.

Derived OEE indicators

In the article OEE and derived indicators TEEP, PEE, OAE, OPE, OFE, OTE and CTE we looked at the derived OEE indicators. Some of the indicators will be followed by the topic of personnel rewarding, so we will briefly repeat them now.

Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) is a quantitative indicator of the efficiency of production equipment. It provides a measurable comparison of the efficiency of individual production facilities and entire manufacturing companies. It includes multiple components affecting overall efficiency, which can be independently evaluated and used to eliminate found losses (organization, performance and quality).

Vertical and horizontal integration of various systems in production companies is a logical trend. MES systems play an irreplaceable role in bridging the gap between enterprise information systems (ERP) and production automation (PLC) systems. While enterprise information systems are centralized, production controllers are inherently distributed. Distributed MES systems try to deal with these systems. They are based on the principle of multi-agent systems with different nature of these systems.

One of the signs that something is a hype in IT business is that it is overused and often also misused by trend-setters, though leaders and vendors. It is apparent this has happened to Industry 4.0. How to go about this? We discuss how to approach this topic in a sober, productive way.

The origins of the term Industry 4.0 can be tracked down to a project about the high-tech strategy of the German government from year 2011, which promoted the computerization of manufacturing. The term Industry 4.0 was publicly introduced in the same year at the Hannover Fair. Nowadays, this term is used by almost every IT or industrial automation company to describe their products or services – and it is creating unnecessary confusion.

The abbreviation MES comes from the English term Manufacturing Execution Systems. These are computer systems used in manufacturing plants to control and monitor production processes that lead to the conversion of raw materials into finished products and help production decision makers make important decisions or detect potential problems as soon as possible, leading to increased production efficiency. One of the main features of MES systems is that they work in real time.

MES systems form a link between enterprise information systems (most often represented by ERP - Enterprise Resource Planning) on ​​the one hand and systems for production process and data collection (mostly SCADA - Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) on the other. More can be found in the article - MES / MOM: Integration with surrounding systems.

Although the title of this article says, “What to Remember when we implement the MES System”, its main goal is to introduce you the Manufacturing Maturity Model. I chose the title of the article from the belief that the Manufacturing Maturity Model should lead you to think about what to really remember when the implementation of MES system comes. A detailed description of the Manufacturing Maturity Model is in White Paper # 38, published by MESA International. The purpose of this article is to provide you with basic information about the existence of Manufacturing Maturity Model and how to use it.

To be successful with MES / MOM implementation, it is important to make the integration with surrounding systems to ensure automated data transfer. This is a demanding part of the implementation, both from a technical and organizational point of view. Many implementation projects will fail because of their unmanaged integration with the surrounding systems. That is why it is very desirable to be well prepared for this part, which can be helped by the following article. Typical systems with which the MES system integrates are as follows: